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Forum » SpaceEngine » Troubleshooting and Solutions » ESI of the earth (Shouldn't it be one?)
ESI of the earth
ElectricalEelDate: Friday, 13.03.2015, 17:51 | Message # 1
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i noticed this today while trying to get a standard to compare planets with,shouldn't the EARTH similarity index of the earth be one?

does this mean there is a planet thats more earth than earth is?

Wikipedia says the esi of the earth is one

Attachments: 1371151.jpg(311Kb)
 
parameciumkidDate: Friday, 13.03.2015, 18:01 | Message # 2
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Wow, that's actually pretty funny. Kinda makes me want to start a CHALLENGE!
Who can be the first to find a planet that's "more Earth than Earth," i.e. has an ESI higher than 0.984?





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pzampellaDate: Friday, 13.03.2015, 18:39 | Message # 3
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Well, that hace been already notice a while ago. However, I think it haven't been explain yet.
People have already found planets with a higher ESI that Earth, you should check on the forum to find it.
 
apenpaapDate: Friday, 13.03.2015, 19:02 | Message # 4
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Earth's elliptic orbit is the problem here. When the Earth gets closer to the Sun, SE considers its temperature to be a little higher, enough to give the ESI a slight dent.




I occasionally stream at http://www.twitch.tv/magistermystax. Sometimes SE, sometimes other games.

Edited by apenpaap - Friday, 13.03.2015, 19:02
 
DiscovererOfWorldsDate: Thursday, 26.03.2015, 19:16 | Message # 5
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Quote apenpaap ()
SE considers its temperature to be a little higher, enough to give the ESI a slight dent.
lesser to what? esi is based on earth.





the universe is made to be explored, but no one will ever visit it all
 
Billy_MayesDate: Thursday, 26.03.2015, 20:34 | Message # 6
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Quote DiscovererOfWorlds ()
esi is based on earth.


ESI is based on a constant and fixed temperature. Earth has a tiny elliptical orbit so the temperature varies a little.





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AerospacefagDate: Thursday, 26.03.2015, 21:33 | Message # 7
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I remember that episode form "Mindbridge"(by Holdeman) when protagonist prepared the abstract on the topic of "habitable zone" and also corrected his teacher, because he did not take the greenhouse effect into account - so that actual "habitable zone" is closer to Sun than Earth is and it's only the greenhouse effect that keeps us safe.
 
DiscovererOfWorldsDate: Saturday, 28.03.2015, 21:15 | Message # 8
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Quote Aerospacefag ()
ESI is based on a constant and fixed temperature. Earth has a tiny elliptical orbit so the temperature varies a little.
will be based on the temperature but also the esi calculates how a planet may be similar to the earth, and space engine calculates the esi according to a temperature that is different from earth even if the esi calculates how a planet may be similar to the earth how is it possible?





the universe is made to be explored, but no one will ever visit it all
 
WatsisnameDate: Sunday, 29.03.2015, 08:52 | Message # 9
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I'm wondering if there is a language barrier, because I thought apenpaap's and Aerospace's explanations were pretty clear. SE's ESI calculation assumes a constant 288K, which is Earth's average temperature. However, Earth's instantaneous temperature is not a constant 288K, because its orbit is not circular. This therefore reduces the ESI.

Basically, for a planet to have an ESI closer to 1.0, not only must its mass, radius, and temperature be similar, but the temperature must also be more constant, by having a less eccentric orbit.

*Caveat: I have not actually confirmed that this is the real reason for Earth's ESI being less than 1.0, but it sounds reasonable and I am pretty sure that it is correct. If someone wants to test it, try making an Earthlike planet in a custom system, and see what happens when you vary the eccentricity.





 
DiscovererOfWorldsDate: Sunday, 05.04.2015, 19:15 | Message # 10
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so it is possible that there are planets with a esi greater than that of the earth?




the universe is made to be explored, but no one will ever visit it all
 
DiscovererOfWorldsDate: Monday, 06.04.2015, 09:38 | Message # 11
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watch this planet: has a esi 979! Earth 984
Attachments: 4620317.jpg(216Kb)





the universe is made to be explored, but no one will ever visit it all
 
pzampellaDate: Tuesday, 07.04.2015, 14:24 | Message # 12
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DiscovererOfWorlds, I can tell that there could be planets more habitable than Earth!
 
WatsisnameDate: Tuesday, 07.04.2015, 21:56 | Message # 13
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Quote pzampella ()
I can tell that there could be planets more habitable than Earth!


ESI is not specifically a measure of habitability, though. It is a measure of how physically similar the planet is to Earth, according to the parameters which are measurable from a distance (size, density, average temperature, etc). Current research suggests that super-Earths (terrestrial planets that are slightly larger than Earth) may be more habitable than our planet. But their calculated ESI would be lower, because of their larger size.

Quote DiscovererOfWorlds ()
so it is possible that there are planets with a esi greater than that of the earth?

In Space Engine, yes. Apparently some people have already found examples of them. smile





 
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