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Forum » SpaceEngine » Archive » Work progress and public beta test - 0.9.7.4
Work progress and public beta test - 0.9.7.4
Ettore_bilboDate: Monday, 27.06.2016, 14:49 | Message # 2956
Space Pilot
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Italy
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Quote steeljaw354 ()
Is there a way to switch oxygen and CO2 probabilities? Like how you go into the universe.cfg and edit stuff?


no, there's not...
anyway, the oxygen in SE it's ok (indeed, it is too present now, I've found many planets with atmospheres virtually flammable :-) )
the problem is CO2 and evolution of our atmosphere... in primordial earth there was a lot of CO2, but with the cooling of the surface and the increase of the quantity of liquid water this CO2 dissolved in oceans going to form limestone ( and the nitrogen present in the oceans is released into the atmosphere)... Also forms of life such as corals have contributed to lowering CO2 levels... then came the cyanobacteria produce oxygen...

the question is: this process we can consider extensible to all the planets of SE? i think yes, it is chemical reactions, so where there are oceans (and a weather cycle) should not be too much CO2...
 
parameciumkidDate: Monday, 27.06.2016, 15:41 | Message # 2957
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As for me I'm finding an annoying prevalence of SO2 in atmospheres. It seems like every single rocky planet out there has at least 1% SO2 in its atmosphere - just enough to poison anyone who tries to go down there, even if there's plenty of oxygen floating around. :\
I'd understand if there's a prevailing theory that most planets have lots of atmospheric sulfur, but so far I haven't heard about any such thing.





Intel HD Graphics 4000 ;P
 
SpaceHopperDate: Monday, 27.06.2016, 16:27 | Message # 2958
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Quote parameciumkid ()
I'm running RC2 and I am getting this bizarre flickering graphical glitch when near black holes (and I'm assuming neutron and white dwarf stars) that have accretion disks. I'm running a laptop with intel integrated graphics which I assume to be the cause of the problem, but am curious as to whether there is a cure?

I think you should update your drivers like I did.
Go to Device Manager by (for Windows 8 and Windows 8.1) pressing the Windows and X keys together or (for Windows 10) right-mouse clicking on the Windows Start icon and selecting Device Manager.
Click Yes when prompted for permission from User Account Control.
Expand the Display adapters section.
Right-click the Intel® graphics entry and select Update Driver Software.
Then click "Search automatically for updated driver software".
You will have to free up some space on your disk if you get a message saying there's not enough space.





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OMGspace_engineDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 12:41 | Message # 2959
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Brazil
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The spaceship's gravity physics is N-body or it tooks only the nearest/most massive object?
Sorry if this is not the correct thread to this, but I didn't find where I can make questions like this
 
pfjarschelDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 18:06 | Message # 2960
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Quote OMGspace_engine ()
The spaceship's gravity physics is N-body or it tooks only the nearest/most massive object?


That's a good question... I believe it only considers the closest object, since any other massive body would have a very small gravity acceleration, and can thus be discarded. You can check that by staying near a planet and checking the grav accel value of the ship (just click on it), and then moving a bit further and checking it again. Whenever the values switches to the star's value, you'll see it's also pretty small.

To really check this, an interesting experiment would be to find two planets that are very close (that is, a moon that is almost as big as the planet), and try to enter a high orbit on any one of them... Should be cool to watch what happens! tongue





"Rush, Where the hell are we?"
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OMGspace_engineDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 18:25 | Message # 2961
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Quote pfjarschel ()
any other massive body would have a very small gravity acceleration, and can thus be discarded

Not to all situation, for example, if want to put the ship in orbit of an moon of a gas giant, if the gravity of the gas giant is considered in the simulation the effect in the orbit can be very noticeable. I'm asking this 'cause I know that in Kerbal Space Program, for example, the physics isn't N-Body, it's not so realistic but make the gameplay much more easy


Edited by OMGspace_engine - Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 18:26
 
Wicker1MDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 19:29 | Message # 2962
Astronaut
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Quote OMGspace_engine ()
I think you should update your drivers like I did.
Go to Device Manager by (for Windows 8 and Windows 8.1) pressing the Windows and X keys together or (for Windows 10) right-mouse clicking on the Windows Start icon and selecting Device Manager.
Click Yes when prompted for permission from User Account Control.
Expand the Display adapters section.
Right-click the Intel® graphics entry and select Update Driver Software.
Then click "Search automatically for updated driver software".
You will have to free up some space on your disk if you get a message saying there's not enough space.



I tried updating my graphics drivers, but the glitch with the gas giant atmospheres is still there. My computer says that my graphics drivers are up to date.

Attachments: 8010024.jpg(134.2 Kb) · 6462115.jpg(134.2 Kb)


Edited by Wicker1M - Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 19:30
 
Wicker1MDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 19:35 | Message # 2963
Astronaut
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My computer is an Acer Aspire E5-571. My graphics card is an Intel Graphics HD 4400. My operating system is Windows 10.

Edited by Wicker1M - Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 19:36
 
Wicker1MDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 20:03 | Message # 2964
Astronaut
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United States
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I also want to point out a discrepancy between the age of Nu Phoenicis shown in RC3 compared to the age of Nu Phoenicis stated in the Nu Phoenicis Wikipedia article:

Wikipedia states that Nu Phoenicis is 5.7 Gyr. However Space Engine RC3 shows Nu Phoenicis as a much younger star.
Wikipedia's article is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nu_Phoenicis

Attachments: 8407591.jpg(188.8 Kb)
 
ZackGDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 21:39 | Message # 2965
Space Pilot
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Got a bug. 91 Aquarii shows that its a hypergiant with a magnitude of -14. That cant be right at all




MOBO:ASUS Sabertooth Mark I
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Memory:32GB 1600Mhz (Corsair 4x8GB)
 
TyrannoFanDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 21:43 | Message # 2966
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United Kingdom
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Quote OMGspace_engine ()
Not to all situation, for example, if want to put the ship in orbit of an moon of a gas giant, if the gravity of the gas giant is considered in the simulation the effect in the orbit can be very noticeable. I'm asking this 'cause I know that in Kerbal Space Program, for example, the physics isn't N-Body, it's not so realistic but make the gameplay much more easy

Quote pfjarschel ()
To really check this, an interesting experiment would be to find two planets that are very close (that is, a moon that is almost as big as the planet), and try to enter a high orbit on any one of them... Should be cool to watch what happens!

I am certain that the game uses N-body physics for your ship at least to a certain extent. The orbital paths do not show your trajectory according to N-body physics, but I have noticed while orbiting a body, a moon for example can make my orbit unstable and make it wobble, and at some point I was kicked out of a system after waiting a while. I am sure you can even take advantage of Lagrange points if you know how.
 
DoctorOfSpaceDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 22:11 | Message # 2967
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Quote TyrannoFan ()
I am sure you can even take advantage of Lagrange points if you know how.


You can, but the physics are not 100% and if you don't switch orbital mode those become unstable as well.





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WallengardDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 23:05 | Message # 2968
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Finland
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Found this in one of the saved locations, labelled as a brown dwarf star.

Also on a side note, I'm having some issues with the pause menu. If I hit esc, sometimes it goes to the menu, sometimes the gui just disappears and I need to keep pressing the key until it works, same goes for getting out of the menu.

Attachments: 1260999.jpg(404.4 Kb)
 
the_nerervarineDate: Tuesday, 28.06.2016, 23:46 | Message # 2969
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Can we force MSAA through the GPU drivers now? The only reason I ask is sometimes driver forced AA yields better performance in some cases.




AMD FX-8320 8 core @4.0ghz , AMD R9 290 4GB, 8GB DDR3 @1866mhz, 1TB Hard Drive
 
steeljaw354Date: Wednesday, 29.06.2016, 13:08 | Message # 2970
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Is there anything I can do about the over exaggerated levels of CO2 in terra atmospheres?
 
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